Mission Statement

Que el pueblo y el gobierno respeten los derechos de todos; entre los individuos como entre
naciones, el respeto al derecho ajeno es la paz
.”


“Let the people and the government respect the rights of others; among individuals as between
nations, peace lies through the respect of the rights of others.”


- Benito Juárez, President of Mexico, 1857-1871


This statement embodies the ideal upon which the Texas Hispanic Journal of Law & Policy is
based. Dedicated to the dissemination of information about the rights of Latinos, the Journal strives
to keep the legal community familiar with relevant issues and promote and accord among the people
of Texas and of the nation.

Purpose

The purpose of the Journal is to serve as an academic forum for legal issues that affect Latinos.
Through academic discussion, the Journal seeks to inform scholars, judges, and practitioners, and
organizations of these issues and, as a result, improve Latinos’ legal representation. As an academic
publication with an informational purpose, the Journal aspires to be a neutral forum open to all
views. Accordingly, the Journal does not advocate particular political views or agendas.

Scope

Latino legal issues are the focal point of the Journal, not a constraining boundary. Thus, the Journal
is an open forum to and for ideas coming from within and from outside the legal community, as
viewed by Latinos and non-Latinos. The Journal seeks to publish works that analyze novel,
significant, or developing legal issues.

* Background image, Presencia de América Latina (Presence of Latin America), also known as Integración de América Latina (Integration of Latin America) is a mural painted by Mexican artist Jorge González Camarena. It is located at the University of Concepción (Ciudad Universitaria de Concepción), in Concepción, Chile.